Rezoning Map

CodeNEXT Is Back

See how the City of Austin’s controversial rezoning plan impacts you!

3 units per lot (R2A and R2B)
6-10 units per lot (RM1)
4-8 units per lot (R4)

The Return of CodeNEXT

CodeNEXT didn’t die—it’s alive and well, thanks to the controversial rezoning plan released by City Hall on October 4, 2019. As part of that plan, local officials want to rezone tens of thousands of existing homes, incentivize their demolition, and allow the construction of apartment, condominium, and other multi-unit developments in their place. Property taxes will soar, displacement will rise, and Austin’s affordability crisis will become even worse.

If Your Property Is Rezoned as R2A or R2B (Purple on Map):

If the city’s rezoning plan is approved, every residential property in Austin will be rezoned for greater density, effectively abolishing single-family zoning throughout the community. Land developers will be allowed to add a pair of large residences to any lot in the city that is 5,000 square feet or larger and has a home 30 years or older already on it. Up to six unrelated adults would be allowed to live in each of the lot’s three homes, and in many cases land developers will not be required to provide space for any additional parking. Click here to see what new developments in R2A and R2B may look like.

If Your Property Is Rezoned as RM1 or R4 (Red or Orange on Map):

The “transition zones” proposed by the city council surround most of the major roadways and transit corridors in Austin. Inside them, land developers will be allowed to construct buildings 40-45 feet tall on individual lots, with 8-10 dwelling units in each. Lots that are 10,000 square feet or larger may be subdivided, allowing 16-20 dwelling units. Up to 60% of each lot can be covered by concrete or other impervious materials, and in many cases land developers will not be required to provide space for any additional parking. Click here to see what new developments in RM1 and R4 zones may look like.

Want to take action? File an official rezoning protest to protect your property from the City of Austin’s plan. Then join us at City Hall on December 7 to let the City Council know how your feel!