CODENEXT IS BACK

Click below to see how City Hall’s “transition zones” impact your area!

Northwest

North

Northeast

West

Central

East

Southwest

South

Southeast

The Return of CodeNEXT

CodeNEXT didn’t die—it’s alive and well, thanks to the controversial rezoning proposal released by City Hall on October 4, 2019. As part of that plan, local officials want to forcibly rezone tens of thousands of existing homes, incentivize their demolition, and allow the construction of apartment, condominium, and other multi-unit developments in their place. Those new developments could be up to 45 feet tall and contain up to 10 individual housing units each, without any requirement for new parking spaces.

Our Entire Community Is Being Rezoned

Until now, most discussion of the city’s plan has focused on transition zones, areas of neighborhoods that are targeted for redevelopment and are located near Lamar, Burnet, Guadalupe, and dozens of other corridors. But if that plan is approved, the entire city will be rezoned for greater density. Land developers will be incentivized to build a pair of new residences on any lot with a structure 30 years or older already on it. Up to six unrelated adults will be allowed to live in each of those three housing units, and developers will not be required to add any additional parking.

About Our Maps

Red Areas:

  • Buildings up to 40 feet tall, with up to 10 individual housing units in each (six units by right and an additional four units with affordability bonus)
  • 10,000 square-foot lots may be subdivided, allowing up to 20 units
  • Up to 60% of each lot can covered by concrete or other impervious materials

Orange Areas:

  • Buildings up to 45 feet tall, with up to eight individual housing units in each (four units by right and an additional four units with affordability bonus)
  • 10,000 square-foot lots may be subdivided, allowing up to 16 units
  • Up to 50% of each lot can covered by concrete or other impervious materials

Take Action!

Sign our petition calling for an end to the city’s plan, then file an official rezoning protest to protect your property! Click below to learn more.

FILE YOUR PROTEST